Teaming Partners

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Organization 
Investigator Name 
Organization Type 
Area of Expertise 
Background, Interest,
and Capabilities
 
Contact Information 
State 
 
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 EnginZymeBeatrix Ellis Small Business Bioenergy EnginZyme is a cell-free synthetic biology company utilising immobilised enzymes (or cascade of enzymes) for the production of chemicals. By converting enzymes into heterogenous catalysts with our proprietary immobilisation technology and operating them in continuous flow fixed bed reactors it is possible to utilise biology to produce chemicals economically. Our full-scope technology platform goes from enzyme engineering through to process design to ensure the most economic utilisation of enzymes in a complete process. The automated development is possible through general, standard processes which allow for fast development, repeatable results and efficient use of manpower. The result is rapid bespoke solutions for cost efficient utilisation of biology in sustainable chemical production.
Website: www.enginzyme.com

Email: beatrix@enginzyme.com

Phone: +44 707916629

Address: Tomtebodavägen 6, Solna, SE 171 65, Sweden
 
 VITOHeleen DeWever Academic Bioenergy VITO stands for the Flemish Institute for Technological Research. VITO is a leading European independent research/consultancy center in the areas of cleantech and sustainable development, elaborating solutions for the grand societal challenges of tomorrow: climate change, food security, a sustainable energy supply, the ageing population and scarcity of resources. VITO's business unit of Separation and Conversion Technology is very active in CO2 conversions and is composed of >100 researchers, managers, support staff and students.

The topic of the upcoming FOA is at the core of VITO’s Sustainable Chemistry research programme, which focuses among others on bioconversions for the valorization of the novel feedstock CO2 and on bioprocess intensification. VITO has been actively working on CO2 bio- and electroconversions for many years now. Research on bioconversions started with fermentative production of PHB (polyhydroxybutyrate) from CO2 using pure cultures and was then expanded to producing PHB/V (polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate) copolymers and tuning PHB/V composition to the specifications of selected applications. More recently, the range of organisms was broadened from aerobic to anaerobic ones, and the range of products to gaseous (isobutene) and dissolved ones (lactate). VITO recently acquired a high pressure fermentor which can be used under ATEX compliant conditions for aerobic and anaerobic conversions up to 10 bar. Test work encompasses the use of both synthetic gases and real offgas streams. Moreover, experimental work is complemented with and supported by model-based approaches.

In the area of CO2 bioelectrosynthesis, activities include conversions using pure or mixed cultures as well as (cascade) enzymatic conversions. Moreover, VITO develops its proprietary gas diffusion electrodes for implementation in (bio)electrochemistry and can supply tailored electrodes up to 0.8-1 m².

Finally, strong expertise is present on techno-economical assessment and benchmarking of CO2 conversion technologies.
Website: www.vito.be

Email: heleen.dewever@vito.be

Phone: +32-499-546786

Address: Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400, Belgium
 
 University of South FloridaRamon Gonzalez Academic Bioenergy The Laboratory for Metabolic Engineering and Biomanufacturing at the University of South Florida focusses on engineering native and synthetic pathways for the efficient bioconversion of sustainable feedstocks to fuels, chemicals, and natural products.
Website: https://www.gonzalezresearchgroup.com

Email: ramongonzale@usf.edu

Phone: (813)-974-3336

Address: 4202 E Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL, 33620, United States
FL
 BioChemInsights, Inc.William B. Armiger, PhD Small Business Bioenergy William Armiger, Ph.D., President, BioChemInsights, Systems Engineering: Over 40 years of industrial experience in developing novel sensors and systems for control of biological processes based upon monitoring the internal reduction state of microorganisms. For this project, BioChemInsights will build upon its electrochemical bioreactor technology developed by Armiger, Dodds and RPI colleagues (6 patents issued or pending).
Website: BioChemInsights.com

Email: warmiger@biocheminsights.com

Phone: 4846862059

Address: 1379 Wistreria Dr, Malvern, PA, 19355, United States
PA
 Visolis, IncDeepak Dugar Small Business Bioenergy At Visolis, we use synthetic biology to manufacture high-performance materials. Our systems approach integrates innovations in biology, chemical catalysis, and process scale-up to enable new bio-based manufacturing platforms. Our unique bio-based approach enables us to achieve truly carbon negative products. We bring deep expertise in bio-process development, integration and scale up with a successful track record in bringing multiple products to market and commercial scale.
Website: www.visolisbio.com

Email: dugar@visolisbio.com

Phone: 617-955-4626

Address: 1488 Zephyr Ave, Hayward, CA, 94544, United States
CA
 University of MinnesotaJeffrey Gralnick Academic Bioenergy The Gralnick lab specializes in physiology, genetics and synthetic biology of environmental bacteria, primarily focusing on microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transport and uptake. We are interested in electrode-interfaced microbes / microbial communities and application of genetic methods to enhance and understand these systems. We are also interested in domesticating recalcitrant environmental microbes that catalyze reactions of interest (electron uptake, for example) and have developed approaches and methods in this area.
Website: https://cbs.umn.edu/gralnick-lab/home

Email: gralnick@umn.edu

Phone: 612-626-6496

Address: 1479 Gortner Ave, St. Paul, MN, 55108, United States
MN
 Industrial MicrobesDerek Greenfield Small Business Bioenergy Industrial Microbes designs and builds bacteria that can use hydrocarbon gases including methane and ethane as raw materials for chemical production. Our expertise areas are metabolic engineering, pathway discovery, enzyme directed evolution, and in vivo assay development. We have the ability to screen and scale-up gas-based fermentations. Most of our work is with E. coli. We are interested to partner with organizations that have electrochemical methods to convert CO2 into reduced gases or alcohols. We are also interested to work with organizations that have new microbial enzyme pathways that have high carbon conversion efficiency to commodity or specialty chemicals.
Website: http://www.imicrobes.com

Email: dgreenfield@imicrobes.com

Phone: 650-731-5499

Address: 1010 Atlantic Ave Ste 101, Alameda, CA, 94501, United States
CA
 UC DavisJustin Siegel Academic Bioenergy Our lab specializes in the use of computational modeling and synthetic biology tools to design and discover novel enzymes.

We are interested in supporting any team looking for a function for which an enzyme is not known (assuming the desired reaction is not breaking any laws of physics) or if there is a known enzyme but it does not have the desired activity (kcat, Km, kcat/Km), specificity, or stability desired.
Website: https://siegel.ucdavis.edu/

Email: jbsiegel@ucdavis.edu

Phone: 5307529910

Address: 451 Health Sciences Dr., GBSF 5315, Davis, CA, 95616, United States
CA
 University of California, IrvineHan Li Academic Bioenergy (1) Using non-canonical redox cofactors to enable novel biochemical reactions and specifically control the flux of reducing equivalent in microbes.
(2) Engineering formate-utilizing microbes for higher alcohol biofuel production.
Website: https://sites.google.com/a/uci.edu/li-laboratory/

Email: han.li@uci.edu

Phone: 9498245668

Address: 916, Engineering Tower, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, 92697, United States
CA
 Capra Biosciences, Inc.Elizabeth Onderko Small Business Bioenergy Capra Biosciences is an early stage biotechnology company that is developing a new bioreactor technology designed to make the production of chemical products more efficient. The Capra Biosciences technology, developed in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory, leverages the unique metabolic features of our non-model platform organisms in our proprietary biofilm bioreactor. The integration of these components has the potential to significantly reduce the downstream processing requirements and costs inherent in the biomanufacturing of products such as fuels.
For the ARPA-E Carbon Optimized Bioconversion program, we are interested in exploring engineered mixotrophic consortia or systems that avoid CO2 evolution in our bioreactor platform. In nature, our platform organism is found in consortia with organisms that metabolize CO2. Microbial consortia containing engineered organisms have the potential to work cooperatively to produce products while consuming CO2. In addition, we are interested in engineering our platform organism to produce high energy density fuels from low cost feedstocks. A key objective of our technology is to optimize biosynthesis for carbon efficiency, and we have interest in collaborating with other organizations to apply our technology in this ARPA-E program.
Our team has expertise in synthetic biology, bioinstrumentation, chemistry, and materials science. We have experience engineering non-model organisms and developing biofilm bioreactors.
Website: http://www.caprabiosciences.com

Email: liz@caprabiosciences.com

Phone: 202-709-4184

Address: 5911 Edsall Rd, #504, Alexandria, VA, 22304, United States
VA
 Wyss Institute at Harvard UniversityMarika Ziesack Academic Bioenergy Our background is in synthetic biology, metabolic engineering, chemolithotrophs and biopolymers. We are interested in developing a microbial system to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen into tailored biopolymers.
Website: https://wyss.harvard.edu/technology/circe-transforming-greenhouse-gases-into-biodegradable-products/

Email: marika.ziesack@wyss.harvard.edu

Phone: 6179531549

Address: 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA, 02115, United States
MA
 Tierra Biosciences (fka Synvitrobio, Inc.)Zachary Sun Small Business Bioenergy Tierra Biosciences (fka Synvitrobio, Inc.) is a cell-free synthetic biology company based in San Leandro, CA with expertise in prototyping proteins, enzymes, and pathways using cell-free extracts derived from E. coli and other organisms. Our first product, Sol by Tierra, allows for on-demand protein production to drive R&D applications, especially in industrial biochemistry and enzymology.

Tierra's interest in the area is to prototype in-vitro pathways through the generation of purified proteins for combinatoric pathway construction and optimization. Would team with those looking to produce bio-products.
Website: www.tierrabiosciences.com

Email: zach@tierrabiosciences.com

Phone: 6467256686

Address: 1955 Davis St. Ste 223, San Leandro, CA, 94577, United States
CA
 Hollings Marine Lab, Medical Univ of South CarolinaHarold May Academic Bioenergy Dr. May is an environmental microbiologist and microbial physiologist with a background in bioremediation, bioenergy, and microbial electrochemistry. His laboratory is at the Hollings Marine Laboratory, a partnership between two academic institutions (the College of Charleston and the Medical University of South Carolina), two federal partners (the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), and the SC Dept. of Natural Resources. He is a Professor of Microbiology at MUSC and a past ARPA-E performer (microbial electrosynthesis of carbon dioxide to chemicals and fuels). He is particularly interested in working with engineers and synthetic biologists on the conversion of renewable electricity and carbon dioxide into valuable products, including fuels.
Website: https://medicine.musc.edu/departments/microbiology/research-program/may-lab

Email: mayh@musc.edu

Phone: 843-876-2404

Address: 68 President Street BEB 101, MSC 501, Charleston,, SC, 29425, United States
SC
 ConagenDavid Nunn Small Business Bioenergy Conagen is an accomplished biotechnology company located in the greater-Boston biotech corridor focusing on the production of sustainable high-value ingredients for bettering humankind and the world.
Our scientists and engineers use the latest synthetic biology tools to redesign metabolic pathways, improve microorganisms, and optimize productivity in the development process.
From our proprietary strain development to fermentation and scaling-up, we impact global partners’ abilities to sell and market products across a broad spectrum of current and developing markets in the food, beverage, nutrition, flavor and fragrance, pharmaceutical, and renewable materials industries. Our mission is to leverage our excellence in carbon optimized biocatalysis and cell-free bioconversion to make a positive impact towards the bio-economy.
Website: https://conagen.com/

Email: richik.mukherjee@conagen.com

Phone: 781-271-1588

Address: 15 DeAngelo Drive, Bedford, MA, 01730, United States
MA
 INP ConsultingIsaac Plant Individual Bioenergy Interested in developing commercial opportunities for early stage bio-conversion technologies. Background in strategic and technical consulting for investors and start-ups. Work has included projects focused on synthetic biology applications in food and the use of seaweed for ruminant methane mitigation. PhD from Harvard in bacterial synthetic biology.
Website: www.isaacplant.com

Email: isaac@isaacplant.com

Phone: 6503870186

Address: 228 Seale Ave, Palo Alto, CA, 94301, United States
CA
 PARCJerome Unidad Large Business Other Energy Technologies PARC, with the support of our parent company Xerox, is continually innovating in the Cleantech space and applying our expertise in hardware and software systems for developing scalable, business-viable solutions to the big challenges in energy and the environment.

We seek to apply our advanced spray technology (PARC Filament Extension Atomizer or FEA) and capabilities in handling viscous and complex fluids to circumvent mass transfer limits in chemical and biological processing. FEA sits in the unique spot of being able to spray or aerosolize high viscosity fluids that cannot be sprayed using conventional means, with tailored spray characteristics (particle size distribution, velocity). The viscosities our technology can handle can be as high 1,000 Pa-s (more viscous than peanut butter).

We've applied this capability to various areas such as drug delivery, spray coating, powder manufacturing and spray drying (on-going work). For the ARPA-E Carbon Bioconversion program, we are interested in developing this as a novel spray column reactor, for circumventing mass transfer limits when in conversion or utilization with high viscosity fluid feedstocks.
Website: https://www.parc.com/competencies/spray-processing/

Email: junidad@parc.com

Phone: 6508124209

Address: 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94103, United States
CA
 BitomeHerb Ryan Small Business Other Energy Technologies Bitome is developing a continuous metabolomic monitoring solution for benchtop bioreactor systems. Quantitative data generated by Bitome's platform can be integrated with process control equipment for yield/titer optimization. Dynamic metabolomic information is also integrated with fluxomic software to predict intracellular parameters -- helping to close the feedback loop in the iterative strain design process. We're seeking to partner with organizations willing to utilize our technology for metabolic engineering of carbon optimized bioprocesses.
Website: www.bitome.com

Email: hryan@bitome.com

Phone: 6173582736

Address: 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, MA, 02130, United States
MA
 SilicoLifeSimão Soares Small Business Other Energy Technologies AI + Biology for sustainable chemicals

SilicoLife designs optimized microorganisms and novel pathways for industrial biotechnology applications, based on artificial intelligence and synthetic biology approaches, shortening the development time and costs of new highly effective processes for the production of specific target compounds such as chemicals, food ingredients or biopolymers.
SilicoLife is considered a highly innovative company, including as one of the 40 Hottest Small Companies in the Advanced Bioeconomy by BiofuelsDigest and Startup of the week by Wired UK.

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Silicolife combines wet and dry lab activities to create optimized cell factories and novel pathways for industrial biotech applications. SilicoLife builds computational models of microbial cells and develops proprietary state-of-the-art algorithms to find the most efficient pathways between raw-material and end-product, streamlining the strain design process and exploring non-intuitive pathway modifications.
Silicolife builds on the experience of an interdisciplinary team of experts in computer science, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, systems biology, molecular biology and bioprocess engineering and cooperates with leading research institutions all over the world.

Leading chemical, materials and synthetic biology companies have chosen Silicolife as development partner to maintain their market edge in increasingly competitive markets.
Website: www.silicolife.com

Email: ssoares@silicolife.com

Phone: +351 965 221 885

Address: Rua do Canastreiro 15, Braga, Braga, 4715-387, Portugal
Braga
 Massachusetts Institute of technologyGregory Stephanopoulos Academic Bioenergy The concept comprises a two stage process that, (a) deploys our acetogen technology to fix CO2 and produce acetic acid (using hydrogen or CO) in the first stage and, (b) converts the acetic acid product to oil or alkanes, in the second stage. In a first demonstration, the CO2 feedstock could be initially CO2 produced in a fermentation plant. This is pure CO2 and avoids complications with CO2 capture. As such, this scheme can be viewed as an energy storage technology converting hydrogen and renewable electricity to a valuable liquid fuel used extensively in current infrastructure.
Key elements of the envisioned process are:
(a) the microbial technology (we have demonstrated this to very satisfactory figures of merit in published and patented work)
(b) supply of renewable hydrogen.
(c) Systems using renewable electricity for direct fixation of carbon dioxide by acetogens
(d) Serious LCA and TEA work.
Website: stephanopouloslab.org

Email: gregstep@mit.edu

Phone: 7813632596

Address: Room 56-469, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
MA
 ZymoChem, IncJon Kuchenreuther Small Business Bioenergy ZymoChem is an early-stage company that is genetically engineering microbes to produce industrial bioproducts. Our mission is to re-shape the chemical industry by developing eco-friendly processes for producing bio-based chemicals that go into making everyday products such as plastics, hygiene products, cosmetics, and fabrics. To accomplish this, we have developed “carbon conserving” microbes designed to minimize/eliminate the wasteful production of CO2 during fermentations and instead direct most/all of the bio-based feedstock carbon to the final product. ZymoChem’s proprietary carbon conserving microbes can deliver up to a 50% increase in fermentation yield compared to state-of-the-art technologies, where this improvement in efficiency lends to bioprocesses with a breakthrough cost-advantage over the petroleum-based production of the same chemicals, even at today’s oil prices. At present, we have established proof-of concept and are optimizing/scaling bioprocesses for several bioproducts.

Our companies near-term primary interests include developing & scaling fermentation processes for the microbial-based conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to small molecule chemicals (e.g., polymeric monomers) as well as biologically-synthesized polymers. Additional interests include complementary technologies for providing electrons / reducing equivalents or energy to maximize yields and improve cost-competitiveness. Long-term interests include the development/implementation of gas-based and cell-free technologies in conjunction with our novel carbon conserving approaches to produce bio-based chemicals.

ZymoChem's bench-scale core capabilities include enzyme development, strain development & characterization, fermentations, downstream process development, and analytics.
Website: http://www.zymochem.com

Email: jon@zymochem.com

Phone: 650-521-7961

Address: 965 Atlantic Ave, Suite 100, Alameda, CA, 94501, United States
CA
 Stanford UniversityNils Averesch Academic Bioenergy Nils is a postdoc in the Criddle-lab at Stanford University, California, and part of CUBES (the Center for Utilization of Biological Engineering in Space), as well as a collaborating scientist at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Before joining CUBES, Nils was the Synthetic Biology Task-Lead with USRA (Universities Space Research Association) as an associate scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. He holds a PhD in Metabolic Engineering from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia and an engineer’s degree (Dipl. Ing.) in Biochemical Engineering, from the Technical University of Dortmund, Germany.
Nils’ expertise is metabolic engineering and his goal is to develop biological production platforms in support of human long-duration space-exploration missions, while creating a sustainable chemical industry on Earth “on the way”. A seed-fund from the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative (NGI), recently allowed him to change focus from heterotrophic microorganisms that require traditional biotechnological feedstocks (like sugars) to C1-feedstock utilizing ones, with the objective to genetically engineer microbial cell factories that produce high-performance polymers.
The target, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), are bio-available thermoplastic polyesters that can be produced from renewable and low-cost carbon-sources such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2). Microbial cell factories for production of PHA polyesters with superior properties will be created, adding value, and increasing commercial attractiveness. Methods and tools essential for metabolic engineering of non-model organism that utilize C1-feedstocks have been established and the infrastructure for in-depth characterization of PHA production capacity of transgenic cell-lines is in place. Specifically, production of novel high-performance aromatic PHAs and aliphatic polyesters can be accomplished through synthetic pathways, but optimization of biosynthetic routes and downstream processing is required before commercialization.
The research at Stanford is backed by Professor Craig Criddle (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) and Professor Robert Waymouth (Department of Chemistry). The Criddle group has long experience with cultivation of C1-fermenting microorganisms for bio-polyester production. Professor Waymouth’s group supports this project through characterization, analysis and testing of the polymeric materials produced.
Website: https://profiles.stanford.edu/nils-averesch

Email: nils.averesch@stanford.edu

Phone: 6505097628

Address: 473 Via Ortega (Y2E2), Stanford, CA, 94305, United States
CA
 Cemvita FactoryTruong Nguyen Small Business Bioenergy Background: Cemvita Factory is a startup focusing on decarbonizing the heavy industries with applications of synthetic biology. We are a multidisciplinary team with strong expertise in oil and gas production, mining, techno-economic analysis, biochemistry, microbiology and molecular biology. Situated in Houston, the energy capital in the world, we have built strategic partnerships and developed synthetic biology-based, carbon-negative applications for our Fortune 500 clients, including Occidental (Oxy) and BHP.
Capabilities: We have two facilities in Houston, one of them is in JLABS, Johnson & Johnson Innovation Center. The JLABS at Texas Medical Center has over 34,000 square feet of common, wet lab, and office space with state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and equipment. This setting allows us to speed up our metabolic engineering efforts to bring new products to the market. Another 3000 square-feet facility in east Houston is for pilot testing with large-scale bioreactors up to 1000L. This facility allows us to connect with chemical plants and energy production at the port of Houston and Baytown area.
Interest: We are looking forward to collaborate with partners in both academic and industry to develop synthetic biology-based technologies to convert CO2 into chemicals and processes and support heavy industry company’s transition to a low-carbon future.
Website: https://www.cemvitafactory.com/

Email: truong@cemvitafactory.com

Phone: 8323401607

Address: 2450 Holcombe Blvd, Suit J, Houston, TX, 77021, United States
TX
 Auburn UniversitySteven Mansoorabadi Academic Bioenergy Mechanistic enzymology
Functional genomics
Biosynthetic pathway elucidation
Molecular and synthetic biology
EPR spectroscopy
X-ray crystallography
Methanogenesis/anaerobic methane oxidation
Photosynthesis
Website: https://www.auburn.edu/cosam/faculty/chemistry/mansoorabadi/index.htm

Email: som@auburn.edu

Phone: 334-844-6954

Address: 179 Chemistry Building, Auburn, AL, 36830, United States
AL
 Opus 12 Inc.Kendra Kuhl Small Business Other Energy Technologies Opus 12 is developing an efficient polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) CO2 electrolyzer that can couple directly to intermittent sources of renewable electricity and convert carbon dioxide emissions and water into carbon monoxide and hydrogen (syngas) for use as a feedstock for gas fermentation to make bioproducts and biofuels. We are interested in talking to potential partners that could use syngas in their bioconversion process to make carbon optimized bioproducts.
Website: www.opus-12.com

Email: operations@opus-12.com

Phone: 510.833.9312

Address: 614 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA, 94710, United States
CA
 Columbia UniversityScott Banta Academic Bioenergy Synthetic Biology, Metabolic Engineering, Extremophiles, Electrofuels, Bioelectrochemistry, Carbon Fixation
Website: https://bantalab.cheme.columbia.edu

Email: sbanta@columbia.edu

Phone: 2128547531

Address: 500 W 120th St, 820 Mudd, New York, NY, 10027, United States
NY
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