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Organization 
Investigator Name 
Organization Type 
Area of Expertise 
Background, Interest,
and Capabilities
 
Contact Information 
State 
 
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 Quaise, Inc.Matt Houde Small Business Other Energy Technologies Background: Quaise is commercializing millimeter-wave drilling systems for deep geothermal heat access and applications involving hard rock destruction. Our platform leverages technology developed for nuclear fusion research to generate high power levels of millimeter-wave energy that can be transmitted efficiently over long distances and applied to rock to generate dielectric heating, rapidly vaporizing the rock into metal-oxide byproducts which can then be removed or utilized. Quaise is looking to collaborate with partners in metals extraction and CO2 sequestration to leverage millimeter wave drilling technology for useful applications in those fields.

Interests: mineral comminution, CO2 mineralization, metals extraction.

Capabilities: An engineering and research team with decades of experience in the O&G industry commercializing drilling technologies; expert advisors in RF engineering and fusion research; working relationships with universities and national labs. Currently acquiring the high-power millimeter-wave technology components (gyrotrons, waveguides) needed for a testing facility in Houston, TX; lab experiments are in progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Website: quaise.energy

Email: matt@quaise.energy

Phone: 8478677227

Address: 501 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
MA
 Los Alamos National LaboratoryGeorge Guthrie (Broad LANL Team) Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Other Energy Technologies Geochemistry—experimental, analytical, reactive-transport simulation
• fluid-rock reactions
• CO2-water-rock reactions
• CO2 mineralization in the subsurface
• ex-situ CO2 mineralization
• critical materials
• wellbore integrity
Website: lanl.gov

Email: geo@lanl.gov

Phone: 5056958329

Address: Mail Stop P228, Los Alamos, NM, 87545, United States
NM
 US Strategic Minerals Exploration LLCThomas Smith, PE Small Business Other Energy Technologies US Strategic Minerals Exploration is a small group of experienced oil and gas professionals who are advancing the commercialization of CCUS technologies with an emphasis on the extraction of Calcium, Magnesium, and Lithium elements that are typically found in solution in high concentration in many geothermally sourced brines. Given the volume of these brines produced and reinjected each day in the US alone in oil fields under waterflood and EOR processes (CO2 flood), there exists a huge, untapped critical mineral resource that requires much less energy to process using CO2 in a mineral carbonation process. CaCO3 and MgCO3 products that are currently manufactured using surface mined Limestone can be manufactured using Calcium and Magnesium sourced from brine and reacted with CO2 in a pH swing process that is well studied and ready for commercial scale-up. This process is typically referred to a PCC manufacturing and the product has a high value in the current paper, paint, and plastics markets due to its whiteness and strength properties.

We at US Strategic Minerals Exploration are eager to partner with academic, government and other like-minded entities in a concerted effort to make a significant reduction in the CO2 footprint of the minerals extraction and processing industries. Simply put, we have the technical research and the experience to take these proven mineral carbonation concepts and technology to the field where the source of feedstock is logistically beneficial for a commercial scale operation. We have identified projects locations in Utah, North Dakota, and Wyoming that meet the economic hurdles necessary for capital investment and Sec 45Q tax relief. Pilot scale testing of our process is needed, once completed we are ready for full scale up and application to similar brine sources world-wide.
Website: www.us-strategic.com

Email: tom.smith@us-strategic.com

Phone: 3036388224

Address: 7955 E Arapahoe Ct, Suite 3800, Centennial, CO, 80112, United States
CO
 DOE National Energy Technology LaboratoryCirce Verba Government Owned and Operated (GOGO) Other Energy Technologies Area of technical expertise: NETL’s research team has experience in advanced characterization techniques, carbonation studies, and critical metal separations for both in-situ and ex-situ processing (benchtop to <15 kg laboratory scale).



Current and historical projects: REE extraction from coal related materials (waste, underclay) and CO2-basalt characterization and reactions.



Interested in collaborating on projects related to “gangue mineral yield” or “carbon negative reaction” focus areas. The team is specifically interested in characterization and enhanced critical metal recovery from mafic formations while limiting decarbonizing impact.

Capabilities:

Characterization: industrial and medical computational tomography, electron microscopes (SEM, EPMA, TEM), X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and ICP-MS/OES. Access to advanced 2D and 3D software to determine petrographic properties (e.g. mineral distribution, mineral areal or volumetric extent, pore space).

Processing and separations laboratories: jaw crusher, rod mills; (6) high pressure/temperature stirred static autoclaves, flow-through unit, leaching columns and stirred batch reactors capable of processing up to 5 or 15 kg respectively.
Website: https://netl.doe.gov/

Email: circe.verba@netl.doe.gov

Phone: 541-918-4437

Address: 1450 Queen Ave SW, Albany, OR, 97322, United States
OR
 Stevens Institute of TechnologyValentina Prigiobbe Academic Other Energy Technologies I am a process and geosystems engineer and I am an assistant professor at Stevens Institute of Technology.
I work on CO2 mineralization for carbon capture, utilization and storage.
My expertise is in modeling and experiments to study: dissolution of silicate and crystallization of carbonates, reactive transport in porous media, and bio-chemical systems.
I studied enhanced dissolution of olivine using organic acids and I am currently exploring the effect of algae to enhance carbonate precipitation from brine.
I am interested in the coupling of CO2 mineralization with mining using both mafic/ultra-mafic rocks and brines.
Website: https://personal.stevens.edu/~vprigiob/index.html

Email: vprigiob@stevens.edu

Phone: 5129634774

Address: 1 Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ, 07030, United States
NJ
 Community Energy, INC.Sandol Park Large Business Other Energy Technologies Community Energy, Inc. (CEI) is a renewable pioneer with over 20 years of experience commercializing utility-scale wind and solar power. CEI’s affiliate Community Energy Solar (CES) developed over 3,000 MW of solar power (about 5% of the nation’s utility scale solar systems) and opened the market for utility-scale solar (as the first to develop a 100 MW scale project) in seven states. To amplify its impact in the urgent fight against climate change, CES merged with The AES Corporation in December of 2021.

Using its expertise in commercializing new technologies, CEI is exploring next generation climate tech ventures, including enhanced carbon mineralization.

The CEI team is eager to collaborate with partners in these initiatives, leveraging its experience in carbonation, integration of renewable energy, mapping, and techno-economic analysis.
Website: https://www.communityenergyinc.com/

Email: sandol.park@communityenergyinc.com

Phone: 267-881-5081

Address: 333 2ND ST APT B, PALISADES PARK, NJ, 07650, United States
NJ
 Designs by Natural Processes, Inc.Carolyn Dry Small Business Other Energy Technologies Background: Dr. Carolyn Dry founded the women-owned small business Designs by Natural Processes, Inc. (DNP) in 2003. Dr. Dry is an emeritus professor from the University of Illinois having also taught at MIT and VPI for a total of 27 years. She has numerous inventions, 23 patents, thousands of citations and vast experience in concrete and ash research, building materials, composites, and self-healing. She is a registered architect. DNP is currently funded under two separate ARPA-E grants.

Interest: DNP is interested in new projects aimed at mineral recovery/re-use, CO2 mineralization, and metal extraction.

Capabilities: Access to minerals comminution laboratory and minerals characterization laboratory
Cement Chemistry Laboratory: batch experiments, Universal Test Machine
Characterization: Gas chromatography
Website: https://www.designsbynaturalprocesses.com/

Email: drycementmixer@aol.com

Phone: 5073124519

Address: 1220 E 7th St., Winona, MN, 55987, United States
MN
 DOE - National Energy Technology Lab (NETL)Burt Thomas Government Owned and Operated (GOGO) Other Energy Technologies NETL through ongoing research programs in critical minerals and predecessors, the Albany Research Center, and the US Bureau of Mines, has extensive experience, IP, and capacity to develop and mature technologies related to mineral processing, beneficiation, characterization and critical mineral recovery. The lab has three research lab campuses with substantial experimental capabilities in Albany, OR, Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV. My particular interests are related to a combination of enhanced critical mineral recovery from CDR waste streams including ex situ processing and extraction of critical minerals in ultramafic rock. We are also interested in understanding and improving processes for the generation of silicate derived soil alkalinity amendments and the potential to recover critical mineral components along that supply chain. Our lab has substantial geologic characterization capabilities in addition to high pressure and temperature experimental facilities to simulate industrial processes at lab bench and barrel-scale.
Website: https://netl.doe.gov/coal/rare-earth-elements

Email: burt.thomas@netl.doe.gov

Phone: 814-769-6036

Address: 1848 Saginaw St S, Salem, OR, 97302, United States
OR
 National Energy Technology LaboratoryChristina Lopano Federal Government Other Energy Technologies Dr. Christina Lopano is a research physical scientist with the U.S. Department of Energy at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA. NETL is a DOE national lab that is part of the Office of Fossil Energy and Carbon Management. A mineralogist by training, Dr. Lopano uses synchrotron characterization to understand mineral dissolution, precipitation, and trace metal chemistry to inform environmental stewardship and resource management.

Background:
• Principal Investigator for Advanced Characterization and Sequential Extraction Chemistry Rare Earth Element Project (NETL-Research and Innovation Center Rare Earth Elements Portfolio, 2014-present) - Expertise in application of advanced geochemical characterization to determine REE binding environments in coal byproducts and acid mine drainage solids to inform environmentally sustainable extraction techniques.
• Responsible for research projects assessing the impacts of mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions on seal integrity and potential environmental contamination under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.
• Responsible for the development and implementation of advanced analytical techniques for the analysis of geologic samples in coordination with multi-disciplinary scientific teams.

Interests: Trace Metal Geochemistry, Mineral binding environments, Mineral dissolution and Precipitation, Critical Minerals, Advanced characterization (synchrotron XAS, XRF, XRD)

Capabilities:
• Instrumentation Capabilities: conventional and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), conventional and synchrotron microprobe X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), GSAS Rietveld Structure Analysis Software

• Research team lead for NETL Research and Innovation Centers fundamental geochemical applied research
Website: N/A

Email: Christina.Lopano@netl.doe.gov

Phone: 412-386-7230

Address: 626 Cochrans Mill Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236, United States
PA
 Lixivia, Inc.Michael Wyrsta Small Business Other Energy Technologies Background: Lixivia is a startup dedicated to mineral recovery, primarily from waste and low grade sources. Our platform technology covers a wide variety of metals and material inputs, including carbon dioxide mineralization, alkaline earths, rare earths, copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, and iron. We have recently begun executing our first commercial project on the east coast, transforming an industrial waste into high value products.

Interest: We are interested in new projects aimed at mineral recovery, co2 mineralization, and metal extraction.

Capabilities: We have a fully functional lab, wet-chem and pilot reactors. Analytics include: ICP-MS, XRF, UV-VIS-NIR, and Whiteness meter. We also have a parallel synthesis and formulation robot. Pilot equipment is also available on site. The Company has pilot-scale extraction and filtration equipment. We have a 10L jacketed, fritted reactor vessel, a 15 L jacketed reaction vessel, a 100 L extraction vessel, and a 200L extraction vessel. The Company also has an eight-liter capacity filter press. Heating equipment includes a Mocon circulated heater to supply heat to all of our reaction vessels.
Website: www.lixivia-inc.com

Email: mwyrsta@lixivia-inc.com

Phone: 8057080708

Address: 824 E Haley St, Santa Barbara, CA, 93103-3113, United States
CA
 Impossible Mining Inc.Oliver Gunasekara Small Business Other Energy Technologies Commercializing low energy, low cost biotechnology, to extract critical minerals for EV batteries and other renewable technologies with no environmental hazards.

This new process, Bio-Extraction, is different from Bio-Leaching (an established practice of using bacteria to generate acid to leach ores) due to the use of metal-oxide reducing bacteria. Bio-Extraction draws on knowledge gained from basic research characterizing these bacteria (funded primarily by the Dept. of Energy to the Nealson Lab.) that do what was previously regarded as unlikely, if not impossible: the direct dissolution of metal oxides by bacterial metabolic activity. The bacteria that accomplish this were discovered by a member of our team (Ken Nealson), and have been shown to be capable of using insoluble metal (iron and manganese) oxides as “oxygen substitutes'' for respiration via a process termed extracellular electron transport (EET). In the process, which we call “breathing rocks'', the metal oxides are electro-chemically reduced, and converted to soluble salts (manganese chloride and iron chloride), While simultaneously freeing trace metals (e.g., nickel, cobalt, copper, etc.) that were bound to the crystal lattice of the metal oxides. This process is achieved at neutral pH, and can be done in seawater (i.e., with no need for freshwater). When the metal oxides are solubilized, the bound trace metals are released into solution, and can be further separated and purified by standard industrial methods for use in EV batteries and other renewable technologies. The waste products are minimal, consisting of bacterial biomass (used to inoculate future batches), and iron carbonates or phosphates of fboth iron and manganese: all valuable commodities.

The energy and environmental impact of current extraction of metals from ores using traditional processing is unsustainable and does not meet the global objectives embodied in the UN sustainable development goals, For example High Pressure Acid Leach (HPAL) is the dominant method of extracting nickel from laterite ore. This method requires large amounts of energy, emits massive amounts of carbon, and generates huge amounts of acidic slurry waste, both of which often lead to environmental disasters.

Kenneth Nealson, PhD is a co-founder, Professor Emeritus of Earth Sciences at USC, and former Director of the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Sciences. Professor Nealson is an author of over 400 technical papers.
Website: https://impossiblemining.com

Email: Oliver.Gunasekara@ImpossibleMining.com

Phone: 408 660 3189

Address: 1145 Mariposa Avenue, San Jose, CA, 95126, United States
CA
 RemoraChristina Reynolds Small Business Transportation Remora designs carbon capture devices for semi trucks. We use solid sorbents to filter carbon dioxide from diesel truck exhaust, resulting in >90% purity recycled CO2.

Remora is interested in advancing CO2 utilization options. Our expertise lies in gas purification, so we would operate best as a supplier of recycled CO2.

We have vehicle, vehicle test equipment, and gas analysis equipment pertinent to our work. We also have the expertise to refine our collected gas to meet nearly any technical specification. Our pilots are geographically distributed, so CO2 is available in locations across the U.S.
Website: https://remoracarbon.com/

Email: christina@remoracarbon.com

Phone: 4434544956

Address: 13685 Otterson Court, Livonia, MI, 48150, United States
MI
 Columbia UniversityScott Banta and Alan West Academic Bioenergy We have collaborated for over a decade looking at biological and electrochemical processes applied to mining processes. Recent work (funded in part by Arpa-E) has focused on copper mining, as well as other critical minerals. We have extensive experience, including genetic modification capabilities, for extremophiles that thrive in relevant environments (particulary low pH, high metal concentrations).
Website: www.columbia.edu

Email: acw7@columbia.edu

Phone: 212-854-4452

Address: Department of Chemical Engineering, New York, NY, 07670, United States
NY
 Bitome IncHerb Ryan Small Business Other Energy Technologies The Bitome platform, rooted in accurate, at-line, and frequent NMR metabolomic analysis during bioreactor runs, alleviates bottlenecks and reduces the number of steps for the key personnel involved in the cycles of bioprocess optimization. Bitome abstracts away the analytical chemistry, assay development, and analysis from the bioprocess engineer, and by contextualizing granular experimental measurement data with experimental design and Program metadata, a bioprocess engineer can more effectively and efficiently optimize and execute campaigns. Bitome offers a field-ready analytical kit to perform at-line metabolomic measurement in existing bioprocess infrastructure. Additionally, Bitome performs bioreactors as a service, with a corresponding digital interface to facilitate experimental design, testing, and learning in the cloud.
Website: www.bitome.com

Email: hryan@bitome.com

Phone: 2078128099

Address: 8 Saint Marys St, Boston, MA, 02115, United States
MA
 Canada Nickel CompanyArthur Stokreef Small Business Other Energy Technologies Canada Nickel is a junior exploration company in the mining sector pursuing net zero production of nickel, cobalt, and iron from the Crawford Project, an ultramafic deposit (containing serpentine, olivine and brucite) located near Timmins, Ontario, Canada. In addition to the Crawford Project, Canada Nickel also owns numerous other ultramafic and mafic equivalent deposits near to Timmins, Ontario.

The tailings and waste rock produced by the Crawford Project are anticipated to spontaneously and permanently capture CO2 when exposed to the atmosphere. Canada Nickel is developing processes to optimize the carbon capture potential of the Project both along the mining-concentration pathway, and after material emplacement in the tailings storage facility. The Crawford Project is currently in the exploration phase, with resource and geotechnical drilling programs, metallurgical testing, CO2 sequestration research, and drafting of the Project’s Feasibility Study underway. The mine is estimated to go into operation in the late 2020s, pending successful completion of permitting and financing.

Canada Nickel is comprised of industry-leading experts in mine design, implementation of complex drilling programs, geology (with an emphasis on ultramafic deposits), process flowsheet development for critical minerals, geophysics, mineral carbonation, environmental sustainability, and the nickel market. Canada Nickel has access to significant resources for laboratory and field tests, and the potential to support large-scale demonstrations at the drilling, construction, and operational phases of the mine over the coming years. Furthermore, Canada Nickel is generating material which could be used for test work that requires magnesium rich slags, nickel sulfide and magnetite/iron concentrates, and magnesium rich mine and mill tailings. The team is looking for partners to support ongoing research into enhanced CO2 sequestration processes that have the potential to deliver carbon capture solutions that are justifiable from an operational and capital cost perspective at current carbon prices, or to explore new ideas related to the net zero recovery of nickel, cobalt, and iron. We are open to solutions which may be implemented along the value chain including: within the deposit, along the handling and concentration pathway, within the tailings storage facility, and/or within downstream reductive smelting and hydrometallurgical unit processing steps.
Website: https://canadanickel.com/

Email: arthurstokreef@canadanickel.com

Phone: 1-343-422-4669

Address: 130 King Street West, Suite 1900, Toronto, Ontario, M5X 1E3, Canada
Ontario
 Virginia TechFeng Lin Academic Other Energy Technologies Physico-chemical characterization of minerals using synchrotron methods (operando, in situ, ex situ)
Carbonate precipitation chemistry and kinetics
Purification and utilization of critically needed elements (Li, Ni, Co, etc)
Evaluation of minerals for battery materials
Negative emission and CO2 related (electro)catalysis
Website: thelinlabatvt.weebly.com

Email: fenglin@vt.edu

Phone: 5402314067

Address: 1040 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States
VA
 University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignNishant Garg Academic Other Energy Technologies I am an Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I have expertise in carbonate mineralogy, carbonation, and CO2 sequestration.

I’m a current ARPA-E awardee and looking to collaborate with others on this call.
Website: garg.cee.illinois.edu

Email: Nishantg@illinois.edu

Phone: 2173009448

Address: 205 N Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL, 61801, United States
IL
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityWencai Zhang Academic Other Energy Technologies Background: Dr. Wencai Zhang received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mineral Processing Engineering, and a Ph.D. degree in Mining Engineering. He has a solid background in the recovery and beneficiation of different types of minerals using various methods, such froth flotation, magnetic separation, and gravity separation. He has rich experience in the surface and solution chemistry aspects associated with the recovery of critical minerals and CO2-reactive minerals, such as monazite, bastnaesite, calcite, dolomite, etc. In addition, he also has rich experience in the mineral beneficiation industry, and he is familiar with almost all the preexisting industrial equipment and flowsheets used for mineral beneficiation. He has successfully proposed a strategy to improve the separation efficiency of monazite, a typical energy-relevant mineral, from calcite by regulating the physical and chemical properties of the minerals.

Interest: The research team of Dr. Zhang has expertise in mineral processing, extractive metallurgy, solution chemistry, surface chemistry, and carbonate chemistry. The team welcome collaboration opportunities focusing on the Mineral Comminution and Yield, Gangue Mineral Yield, and Applied Research topics.

Capabilities: The mineral processing laboratory lab at Virginia Tech is equipped with numerous equipment that can be used for bench-scale and pilot-scale mineral recovery studies. The research team of Dr. Zhang has been focusing on the recovery of valuable minerals, especially critical minerals, using different approaches, such as density, magnetic, and froth flotation separations. The group is also developing more sustainable approaches to recover low-grade, low-quality critical minerals from complex ores. The team has the capability to design a process circuit to beneficiate a run-of-mine ore to a high-grade concentrate that can be directly fed to refining.
Website: https://sites.google.com/vt.edu/wczrg/research?authuser=0

Email: wencaizhang@vt.edu

Phone: 8593516264

Address: 118A Surge Building, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States
VA
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityWencai Zhang Academic Other Energy Technologies Background: Dr. Wencai Zhang received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mineral Processing Engineering, and a Ph.D. degree in Mining Engineering. He has a solid background in the recovery and beneficiation of different types of minerals using various methods, such froth flotation, magnetic separation, and gravity separation. He has rich experience in the surface and solution chemistry aspects associated with the recovery of critical minerals and CO2-reactive minerals, such as monazite, bastnaesite, calcite, dolomite, etc. In addition, he also has rich experience in the mineral beneficiation industry, and he is familiar with almost all the preexisting industrial equipment and flowsheets used for mineral beneficiation. He has successfully proposed a strategy to improve the separation efficiency of monazite, a typical energy-relevant mineral, from calcite by regulating the physical and chemical properties of the minerals.

Interest: The research team of Dr. Zhang has expertise in mineral processing, extractive metallurgy, solution chemistry, surface chemistry, and carbonate chemistry. The team welcome collaboration opportunities focusing on the Mineral Comminution and Yield, Gangue Mineral Yield, and Applied Research topics.

Capabilities: The mineral processing laboratory lab at Virginia Tech is equipped with numerous equipment that can be used for bench-scale and pilot-scale mineral recovery studies. The research team of Dr. Zhang has been focusing on the recovery of valuable minerals, especially critical minerals, using different approaches, such as density, magnetic, and froth flotation separations. The group is also developing more sustainable approaches to recover low-grade, low-quality critical minerals from complex ores. The team has the capability to design a process circuit to beneficiate a run-of-mine ore to a high-grade concentrate that can be directly fed to refining.
Website: https://sites.google.com/vt.edu/wczrg/research?authuser=0

Email: wencaizhang@vt.edu

Phone: 8593516264

Address: 118A Surge Building, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States
VA
 Michigan Technological UniversityTimothy Eisele Academic Other Energy Technologies Background: Research and Teaching in Minerals Processing, Hydrometallurgy, and Pyrometallurgy. Currently Associate Professor in Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University. Have worked with coal preparation, iron ore beneficiation/pelletization/smelting, copper beneficiation, industrial waste processing/utilization, CO2/mineral reactions, salt refining, metals recycling, bioleaching.

Currently working on a process for bioleaching and recovery of manganese and iron from low-grade ores, without excavation or comminution.

Interested in collaborating on projects that involve increasing comminution efficiency; bioleaching; CO2 reaction with ore minerals; low-environmental-impact mineral recovery.

Capabilities:
- Minerals comminution laboratory, including jaw crusher, gyratory crusher, cone crusher, roll mills, Bond grindability ball mill, laboratory rod and ball mills, stirred attrition mill, air classifier, shaking screens, complete set of test sieves, rotary sample splitter, riffle splitters, ring-and-puck pulverizer.

- Separations laboratory, including froth flotation cells, electrostatic separator, low- and high-intensity magnetic separators, jigs, pressure filters, wet chemistry facilities for chemical analysis.

- Wet-basin area for small pilot-scale testing, including a froth flotation column and hydrocyclone test stands, and room for leaching tanks and columns with associated pumps.

- Furnaces for pyrometallurgy works, operating temperatures up to 1500 deg. C and process volumes up to several kilograms.

- Thermogravimetric analyzer, spectrophotometers, and a Malvern zeta-sizer

- Access to the Michigan Technological University ACMAL facility, which includes electron microscopes, microprobes, and X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence capability.
Website: https://www.mtu.edu/chemical/department/faculty/eisele/

Email: tceisele@mtu.edu

Phone: 9064872017

Address: Dept. of Chemical Engineering, MTU, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI, 49931-1295, United States
MI
 University of MassachusettsKaren Johannesson Academic Other Energy Technologies 2020 - Present, Professor of Geochemistry, School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA

2020 - Present, Director of the Environmental Analytical Facility, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA

2007-2019 - Cochran Family Professor of Geochemistry and Chemical Hydrogeology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA

Environmental Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, Trace Element Speciation, Geochemical Modeling, Chemical Hydrogeology, Reaction Path and Reactive Transport Modeling, Geochemistry of the Rare Earth Elements
Website: https://www.umb.edu/faculty_staff/bio/karen_h_johannesson

Email: karen.johannesson@umb.edu

Phone: (617) 287-7456

Address: 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA, 02125, United States
MA
 Savannah River National LaboratoryDien Li Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Other Energy Technologies Background:

Education and Training
 LANL Director’s Post-doctor Fellow: Earth Science / Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), 1997
 Japan Science and Technology Agency Post-doctor Fellow: Materials Science and catalysis, National Institute for Material and Chemical, Japan, 1995
 Ph.D.: Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada, 1994
 M.Sc.: Mineral Chemistry, Central South University, Changsha, China, 1985
 B.Sc.: Geology/Geochemistry, Central South University, Changsha, China, 1982

Employment history
 2011-current: Fellow Scientist/Senior Fellow Scientist, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA
Research activities: 1) Nano and porous materials for removal of heavy metals and critical metals from aqueous media; 2) Molecular interaction and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metals with solid substrates; 3) Separation of actinides from nuclear tank waste sludges
 2000-2011: Senior Scientist, Engis Corporation, Wheeling, IL, USA
Research activities: 1) Characterization, separation and grading of nano diamond powder; 2) Chemical formulations and dispersion of nano diamond particles
 1985-1989: Lecturer/Assistant Lecturer, Central South University, China
Research activities: 1) Mineralogy and geochemistry of rare-earth metal deposits in Jiangxi, China; 2) Processing mineralogy, characterization and extraction of Au and Ag from metallic sulfide ores in China; 3) Metal sulfide mineralogy and geochemistry

Interests:

1) Extraction and separation of critical metals including rare earth elements from electronic and industrial waste streams
2) Nano and porous materials for separation of critical metals and toxic heavy metals from aqueous media
3) Water-rock and water-solid interfacial molecular interactions and microscopic/spectroscopic characterization
4) Separation of actinides from nuclear tank waste sludges
5) Carbonation of ultramafic rocks for CO2 sequestration and critical metals (e.g., Ni, Cu and Platinum group elements (PGE)) extraction

Capabilities:
1) Chemistry laboratory: batch and column experiments, ICP-MS, ICP-OES
2) Characterization laboratory: XRD, SEM, FTIR, Raman, and other mineralogical characterization methods
3) DOE user facilities: a regular user at several DOE user facilities including Advanced Photo Sources, as well as at Canadian Light Source
4) Geochemical modeling
Website: N/A

Email: dien.li@srs.gov

Phone: 803-507-1899

Address: 773-42A, Room 237, Aiken, SC, 29808, United States
SC
 The University of Texas at AustinEstibalitz (Esti) Ukar Academic Other Energy Technologies - Expertise in structural geology, petrology, microtectonics
- Structural diagenesis of fractured rocks

Looking to partner with geochemical and flow modelers and CO2 sequestration experts to tackle questions regarding the evolution of physico-chemical AND deformational (fracturing) changes during carbonation reactions:

(3) Carbon Negative Reactions: A category focused on fundamental research into carbon-negative reactions. The team's expertise should include laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and characterization of physico-chemical changes during rock carbonation. Preferably, the team should have expertise in CO2 sequestration, mafic-ultramafic petrology, carbonate chemistry, and catalysis.

Relevant studies:
- Menzel, Urai, Ukar et al., 2021. "Ductile deformation during carbonation of serpentinized peridotite". Accepted in Nature Communications.
-Mineralogic-deformational evolution during natural carbonation of ultramafic rocks (listvenites) in the Samail Ophiolite (Oman) (field and
laboratory study)
- Ukar and Laubach, 2016. "Syn- and postkinematic cement textures in fractured carbonate rocks: insights from advanced cathodoluminescence imaging". Tectonophysics 690, p. 190-205.
- Textures in carbonate mineral-filled fractures as revealed by SEM-CL serve to decipher the chemical-deformational evolution of fractured
rocks, including porosity and permeability changes associated with fractures

Laboratory capabilities:
- Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) specialized in cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL), including hard-to-image carbonates
- Hydrothermal laboratory
Website: https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/sdi/

Email: esti.ukar@beg.utexas.edu

Phone: 5127972639

Address: 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX, 78758, United States
TX
 University of California, BerkeleyLaura Nielsen Lammers Academic Other Energy Technologies Prof. Lammers is an environmental geochemist specializing in carbonate mineralization and selective element extraction. She is an assistant professor at UC Berkeley and holds a faculty scientist appointment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her work combines molecular isotopic tracers and advanced imaging to develop mechanistic models of mineral growth and ion exchange reactions in complex aqueous solutions. Dr. Lammers is developing a process for direct air capture of carbon dioxide with durable storage (DCDS) that generates sulfuric acid for critical element extraction as a co-product (patent pending) and is interested in developing partnerships. Completed bench-scale tests demonstrate that gypsum carbonation reactions can be combined with an electrochemical cell to efficiently generate sulfuric acid by hydrolysis while capturing and permanently sequestering carbon dioxide from air as calcium carbonate. The Lammers environmental geochemistry group at UC Berkeley is equipped with a wet chemical laboratory including mixed flow reactors, chemostat reactors, and electrochemical cells, in addition to advanced imaging and elemental analysis capabilities.
Website: https://nature.berkeley.edu/~lnlammers/

Email: lnlammers@berkeley.edu

Phone: 713-201-0028

Address: University of California, Berkeley, 130 Mulford Hall #3114, Berkeley, CA, 94720, United States
CA